Goodbyes and new openings

It is now nearly seven years when I had the privilege to become the editor-in-chief of our LLinE journal. Taking charge of the journal was in many ways a smooth process, thanks to the grounding work of my predecessor professor Kauko Hämäläinen from the University of Helsinki. I would also like to recognize the pivotal

24.06.2013

It is now nearly seven years when I had the privilege to become the editor-in-chief of our LLinE journal. Taking charge of the journal was in many ways a smooth process, thanks to the grounding work of my predecessor professor Kauko Hämäläinen from the University of Helsinki. I would also like to recognize the pivotal work of Eeva Siirala, former managing editor of LLinE, from the Finnish Lifelong Learning Foundation whose passionate work with professor Hämäläinen and the international editorial board led way to the continuous development of the journal.

As we all know, Lifelong Learning in Europe (LLinE), established in the year 1996 and edited by the Finnish Lifelong Learning Foundation, is a journal with a unique and ambitious concept. It is a trans-European journal dedicated to the advancement of adult education, lifelong learning, intercultural collaboration and best practice research. The journal is targeted at researchers, advocates, decision makers and educators – the whole spectrum of the adult education field. The core values of LLinE are drawn from a view of lifelong learning as crucial to societal and individual wellbeing and active civil society. These core values are also a pivotal part of the Finnish lifelong learning policy.

In following the legacy of LLinE, I have wanted to cultivate LLinE as a collective endeavour. For me, the power and success of LLinE lies very much in its participatory working culture that values collaboration and knowledge co-creation. Without a strong community of practice, with several committed individuals and communities, both national and international, LLinE would hardly be what it is and stands for today. It is these values and mission that I have also wanted to cherish in my chapter of LLinE editorialship.

In this connection, I would like to express my appreciation to acting managing editor Markus Palmén. It has been a pleasure to collaborate with him in developing the journal in and for the digital and global age.

I would also like to express my sincere thanks to international editorial board members; Renée David Aeschlimann, Centre Inffo, France, ?Antra Carlsen, NVL (Nordic Network for Adult Learning), Norway, Anneli Eteläpelto, Finnish Adult Education Research Society, Finland, Uwe Gartenschlaeger, dvv international (German folk high school association), Germany, ?Mary Claire Halvorson, Goldsmiths University, UK, ?Peter Jarvis, University of Surrey, UK,? Antti Kauppi, Finnish Adult Education Research Society, Finland, ?Katarina Popovic, University of Belgrade, Serbia, and Magda Trantallidi-Papadimitriou, General Secretariat of Adult Education, Greece.

I would also like to specially acknowledge my appreciation to Anneli Kajanto and Sanna Raiskio who have recently stepped down from the editorial board. My sincere thanks also go to all earlier members of the international editorial board with whom I have had the privilege to work with for the advancement of LLinE. Last but not least, my thanks go to all authors and readers of our LLinE. Without you we would not make up a community of lifelong learners.

As my turn as the editor-in-chief is coming to an end, I would like to wish all the best for the future of LLinE. New openings are ahead as LLinE joins forces with Infonet adult education.
In the spirit of our present theme focusing on active citizenship, I would like to end with the words of Margaret Mead.

‘Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful citizens can change the world. Indeed it is the only thing that ever has.‘ -Margaret Mead

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